Cool Tools We Saw in 2020

Whoever received any of the following as a gift this holiday season is probably pretty psyched.

Festool unveiled their unfurling STM-1800, a portable sawing table for contractors working in the field.



The German power tool manufacturer also released their new Edge Sanding Guide, making perfect 90-degree edges a snap.

We spotted these dinosaur-inspired Japanese pliers designed specifically to remove stripped screws.

Austria’s Beck Fastener Group developed a system of wooden nails that can be fired from a nailgun. Not having to worry about metal nails while sanding and re-sanding is a huge plus.



Keith Manufacturing’s staggered-slat “walking floor” designed to automatically unload trucks is freaking amazing.

This XDrill from Robbox is a gimmicky cordless drill that’s got one killer feature: It indicates when it’s perfectly plumb or level.



Speaking of gimmicky drills, we were surprised to see that Worx’s SD Driver, which features a screw holder and six-bit revolver, actually got rave reviews from users.

For hand driving, we came across this wicked auto-feeding screwdriver:

A clever invention for moving vehicles without driving them is the GoJak Wheel Dolly.

A neat tool from Japan is the SS-02 Solder Sucker, designed to be used by the hand not holding the soldering iron:

Also from Japan, we got a look at the design innovations Niigata Seiki puts into their metal rulers:

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We learned that Crescent makes an adjustable wrench with a vise-grip-style locking handle:

We also encountered this clever design for a folding ladder:

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On the outdoor tool front, we coveted these remote controlled lawn mowers, which can go places you’d never think of going on a rider:

Maybe not a “tool” per se, but those mowers seem to have cousins in the new firefighting robots rolled out by the L.A. Fire Department:



Lastly, a mechanical engineer who lost most of his hand in an accident–and found insurance wouldn’t cover it–built his own prosthetic hand, with the ability to plug power tools into it.

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Rain Noe

    I’m a lapsed industrial designer. I was born in NYC and figured I’d die there, but a few years ago I abandoned New York to live on a farm in the countryside with my wife. We have six dogs.

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    Rain Noe