Secretary-General’s remarks at the launch of the Policy Brief on a New Agenda for Peace

United Nations Secretary-General

20 July 2023

[Bilingual, as delivered, follows; scroll down for all-English and all-French versions]

Excellencies,


Ladies and Gentlemen, distinguished guests,

I am pleased to join you today to present our Policy Brief: The New Agenda for Peace. This is the latest in our series of Policy Briefs expanding on the recommendations in Our Common Agenda.

We are on the verge of a new era.

The post-Cold War period is over, and we are moving towards a new global order and a multipolar world.

The Policy Brief on a New Agenda for Peace outlines my vision of multilateral efforts for peace and security, based on international law, for a world in transition.

This new era is already marked by the highest level of geopolitical tensions and major power competition in decades.

Many Member States are growing skeptical of whether the multilateral system is working for them.

Violations of international law are becoming more common.

Deep and, in some cases, justified grievances about double standards and unmet commitments are undermining cooperation.

At the same time, the world faces new and developing threats that require urgent, united action.

Conflicts have become more complex, deadly, and harder to resolve. Last year saw the highest number of conflict-related deaths in almost three decades.

Concerns about the possibility of nuclear war have re-emerged.

New potential domains of conflict and weapons of war are creating new ways in which humanity can annihilate itself.

Inequalities within and between states are growing, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Human rights are under attack across the world, including a pernicious pushback against women’s rights.

Distrust in public institutions is mounting, fueled by exclusion and marginalization.

Terrorism remains a global scourge.

The climate emergency is intensifying competition for resources and exacerbating tensions.

And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has made it even more difficult to address these challenges.

If every country fulfilled its obligations under the Charter, the right to peace would be guaranteed.

But when countries break those pledges, they create a world of insecurity for everyone.

The very tenets of multilateralism and the collective security system have been questioned: the UN Charter and international law; regional security architectures; nuclear disarmament and de-escalation.

Frameworks for global cooperation have not kept pace with this new global landscape.

The UN75 Declaration asked me to consider global threats — and to make concrete recommendations on how to address them.

The Policy Brief on the New Agenda for Peace outlines an extensive and ambitious set of recommendations that recognize the inter-linked nature of many of these challenges.

It is framed around the core principles of trust, solidarity, and universality that are foundational to the Charter and to a stable world.

This Policy Brief is also part of my commitment to link actions for peace with the Sustainable Development Goals. If we achieve the vision set out in the 2030 Agenda, our world will be more peaceful and secure as well as more sustainable.

Excellencies,

The New Agenda for Peace presents twelve concrete sets of proposals for action, in five priority areas. I will go through these priorities briefly.

First, we need strong measures to bolster prevention at the global level, by addressing strategic risks and geopolitical divisions.

The nuclear disarmament and arms control regime is eroding; non-proliferation is being challenged; and a qualitative race in nuclear armaments is underway.

Reducing the existential risk posed by nuclear weapons is an urgent priority – but it is not enough. We must do everything possible to eliminate this risk – by eliminating nuclear weapons.

This Policy Brief therefore calls on Member States to urgently recommit to pursuing a world free of nuclear weapons, and to reinforce the global norms against their use and proliferation.

Pending their total elimination, States possessing nuclear weapons must commit to never use them.

We also need to step up preventive diplomacy at the global level in the face of growing fragmentation, and the potential emergence of geopolitical blocs with different trade rules, supply chains, currencies and internets.

The Policy Brief calls on all countries to prioritize diplomacy – particularly when states disagree; and to make full use of my good offices to bridge divides, so that humanity does not become collateral damage in an all-out geopolitical competition between major powers.

The United Nations, as the only truly universal platform, must be at the centre of these efforts.

The Policy Brief also calls for investment in regional security architectures that can rebuild trust between Member States and support diplomacy at the global level.

Excellences,

Deuxièmement, cette note d’orientation propose une vision de la prévention des conflits et de la violence et du maintien de la paix qui s’applique à tous, dans chaque pays, à chaque instant.

Elle appelle à un nouveau paradigme de la prévention qui combatte la violence sous toutes ses formes, privilégie la médiation, promeut la cohésion sociale et qui donne la priorité aux liens entre le développement durable, l’action climatique et la paix ;

Et qui est ancré dans le plein respect de tous les droits humains – civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux et culturels.

Pour cela, il faut envisager le continuum de la paix dans son ensemble et adopter une approche globale, qui identifie les causes profondes des conflits et empêche les graines de la guerre de germer.

La stagnation et l’inversion des progrès accomplis sur plus de la moitié des cibles associées aux Objectifs de développement durable ont de graves répercussions pour la paix et la sécurité internationales. Ce n’est pas une coïncidence si les pays touchés par un conflit sont aussi les plus en retard dans la réalisation des ODD.

Nous devons accélérer la mise en œuvre du Programme 2030, en ayant conscience que la prévention et le développement durable sont interdépendants et se renforcent mutuellement.

L’accès à l’éducation et aux soins de santé sont des moyens de développement dont on sait qu’ils permettent de renforcer le contrat social et la sécurité humaine.

La note d’orientation appelle également à une transformation des dynamiques de pouvoir genrées dans tous les domaines, notamment en matière de paix et de sécurité.

L’incrémentalisme – le changement à tout petit pas – n’a pas permis de réaliser le programme pour les femmes et la paix et la sécurité.

Les gouvernements doivent prendre des mesures ciblées, y compris l’introduction de quotas :

Pour garantir une participation significative et un leadership des femmes dans la prise de décision ;

Pour éliminer toutes les formes de violence à l’égard des femmes ;

Et faire pleinement respecter tous leurs droits.

Le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix appelle également les États Membres à réduire leurs dépenses militaires et à interdire les armes inhumaines et d’emploi aveugle.

Excellencies,

The third priority area is to update our approach to peace operations, recognizing the realities of today’s conflicts.

United Nations peacekeeping represents multilateralism in action, giving all those who contribute a direct stake in our collective security.

It has contributed to saving millions of lives, by helping to preserve ceasefires, protect civilians from violence, and supporting parties to conflict to return to the peace table.

But longstanding unresolved conflicts, driven by complex domestic, geopolitical and transnational factors, and a persistent mismatch between mandates and resources, have exposed its limitations.

Peacekeeping operations cannot succeed where there is no peace to keep.

Nor can they achieve their goals without clear, prioritized and realistic mandates from the Security Council, centred on political solutions.

Missions must have adequate resources and the full political support of the Security Council, with active, continuous engagement with all parties.

The Policy Brief calls for a serious, broad-based reflection on the future of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations, with a view to moving towards nimble, adaptable models with appropriate exit strategies in place.

The fragmentation of conflicts, which often involve non-state armed groups, criminal gangs, terrorists and opportunists, has increased the need for multinational peace enforcement, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency operations.

The Policy Brief calls on Member States to recognize this need, and urges the Security Council to authorize peace enforcement action by regional and sub-regional organizations.

This action should be fully in line with the UN Charter and international humanitarian and human rights law, backed by inclusive political efforts to advance peace.

There is no continent in greater need of this new generation of peace enforcement missions than Africa.

The proliferation of non-state armed groups, including terrorist groups, operating across borders presents a major and growing threat in several parts of the continent.

The New Agenda for Peace therefore reiterates my call for peace enforcement missions and counter-terrorism operations, led by African partners with a UN Security Council mandate under Chapters VII and VIII of the UN Charter and with guaranteed funding including through assessed contributions.

Decisions on this are long overdue.

The New Agenda for Peace is a critical opportunity for Member States to begin the process of updating multilateral peace operations for today’s world.

Excellencies,

The fourth priority area is to prevent the weaponization of emerging domains and technologies, and promote responsible innovation.

From artificial intelligence to emerging biological risks, new technologies – and the complex interaction between them – present a host of new threats that go far beyond our current governing frameworks.

While there is broad agreement that international law applies in cyberspace, there is still a lack of clarity on how it applies – including in relation to the cyber dimensions of conflict.

The Policy Brief on a New Agenda for Peace puts forward detailed proposals for Member States to tackle the extension of hostilities to cyberspace and outer space.

Infrastructure essential for public services and to the functioning of society must be declared off-limits to malicious cyber activity.

It also calls on Member States to adopt, by 2026, a legally binding instrument to prohibit lethal autonomous weapons systems that function without human control.

It highlights the need for new national strategies to mitigate the peace and security implications of artificial intelligence. And it calls for a multilateral process to develop norms, rules and principles around military applications of AI, while ensuring engagement with stakeholders from industry, civil society and other sectors.

I welcome calls from some Member States, and from industry experts and the scientific community, to consider the creation of a new global body to mitigate the peace and security risks of AI while harnessing its benefits to accelerate sustainable development.

To inform discussions, I am convening a High Level Advisory Body to outline options on global AI governance, which will report back by the end of the year.

Excellencies,

The fifth priority area is updating our collective security machinery to restore its legitimacy and effectiveness.

The world needs collective security structures that represent the geopolitical realities of today, and the contributions made by different regions to global peace.

The New Agenda for Peace provides a generational opportunity to address this critical issue.

The Policy Brief recommends urgent reforms to the Security Council to make it more just and representative, and the democratization of its procedures.

It proposes revitalizing the work of the General Assembly and reforming the disarmament machinery.

It also proposes enhancing the role of the Peacebuilding Commission.

The Security Council in particular should more systematically seek the advice of the Commission on the peacebuilding dimensions of the mandates of peace operations.

Prevention at the global level also requires efforts to right the injustices and inequities built into our global financial architecture, which are addressed in our dedicated Policy Brief.

Excellencies,

Before I close, allow me to say a few words about the final two policy briefs expanding on the recommendations in Our Common Agenda.

The Policy Brief on Transforming Education will propose an overhaul of education systems to better equip individuals and societies with new skills, capacities and mindsets for our rapidly changing world.

At its core it will be a call for the creation of true learning societies in every country, built on comprehensive systems of lifelong learning; on a rethink of what and how we learn; and on scaled-up international cooperation to ensure access for all to education as a global public good.

The Policy Brief on UN 2.0 will set out my vision for a modernized United Nations that harnesses state-of-the-art skills and approaches to empower Member States in accelerating the 2030 Agenda.

We intend to shift expertise to areas that are vital in the 21st century: data, digital innovation, strategic foresight, and behavioural science.

We will also foster a more forward-thinking and inclusive culture across the UN, increasing support for creativity, agility, geographic diversity, gender equality, and youth empowerment.

The purpose of all the Policy Briefs in the series is to support your deliberations in preparation for the Summit of the Future next year.

The Summit will be an occasion to address the serious risks and significant opportunities we face;

To deliver on unmet commitments while rising to new challenges;

And to restore trust in each other and in multilateral action, through a Pact for the Future that updates global systems and frameworks to make them fit for the challenges of today and tomorrow.

I urge you to agree a scope for the Summit that is clear, streamlined and comprehensive, focused on new challenges and filling gaps in the multilateral system.

Excellencies,

Peace is the driving force behind the work of the United Nations.

Today’s new threats to peace create new demands on us. This Policy Brief on the new Agenda for Peace is our attempt to meet those demands.

I urge Member States to debate it and to engage with our proposals.

Time and again the United Nations has demonstrated its convening power as a platform for broad-based coalitions and effective diplomacy. Deep disagreements have been transcended to take collective action against critical threats.

Our Organization is, and must remain, central to multilateralism.

In our fractured, troubled world, it is incumbent upon States to preserve our universal institution, in which they all have a stake.

The time to act is not when the divisions and fractures have engulfed us.

The time to act is now.

Thank you.

****************************************************************************

[All-English]

Excellencies,


Ladies and Gentlemen, distinguished guests,

I am pleased to join you today to present our Policy Brief: The New Agenda for Peace. This is the latest in our series of Policy Briefs expanding on the recommendations in Our Common Agenda.

We are on the verge of a new era.

The post-Cold War period is over, and we are moving towards a new global order and a multipolar world.

The Policy Brief on a New Agenda for Peace outlines my vision of multilateral efforts for peace and security, based on international law, for a world in transition.

This new era is already marked by the highest level of geopolitical tensions and major power competition in decades.

Many Member States are growing skeptical of whether the multilateral system is working for them.

Violations of international law are becoming more common.

Deep and, in some cases, justified grievances about double standards and unmet commitments are undermining cooperation.

At the same time, the world faces new and developing threats that require urgent, united action.

Conflicts have become more complex, deadly, and harder to resolve. Last year saw the highest number of conflict-related deaths in almost three decades.

Concerns about the possibility of nuclear war have re-emerged.

New potential domains of conflict and weapons of war are creating new ways in which humanity can annihilate itself.

Inequalities within and between states are growing, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Human rights are under attack across the world, including a pernicious pushback against women’s rights.

Distrust in public institutions is mounting, fueled by exclusion and marginalization.

Terrorism remains a global scourge.

The climate emergency is intensifying competition for resources and exacerbating tensions.

And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has made it even more difficult to address these challenges.

If every country fulfilled its obligations under the Charter, the right to peace would be guaranteed.

But when countries break those pledges, they create a world of insecurity for everyone.

The very tenets of multilateralism and the collective security system have been questioned: the UN Charter and international law; regional security architectures; nuclear disarmament and de-escalation.

Frameworks for global cooperation have not kept pace with this new global landscape.

The UN75 Declaration asked me to consider global threats — and to make concrete recommendations on how to address them.

The Policy Brief on the New Agenda for Peace outlines an extensive and ambitious set of recommendations that recognize the inter-linked nature of many of these challenges.

It is framed around the core principles of trust, solidarity, and universality that are foundational to the Charter and to a stable world.

This Policy Brief is also part of my commitment to link actions for peace with the Sustainable Development Goals. If we achieve the vision set out in the 2030 Agenda, our world will be more peaceful and secure as well as more sustainable.

Excellencies,

The New Agenda for Peace presents twelve concrete sets of proposals for action, in five priority areas. I will go through these priorities briefly.

First, we need strong measures to bolster prevention at the global level, by addressing strategic risks and geopolitical divisions.

The nuclear disarmament and arms control regime is eroding; non-proliferation is being challenged; and a qualitative race in nuclear armaments is underway.

Reducing the existential risk posed by nuclear weapons is an urgent priority – but it is not enough. We must do everything possible to eliminate this risk – by eliminating nuclear weapons.

This Policy Brief therefore calls on Member States to urgently recommit to pursuing a world free of nuclear weapons, and to reinforce the global norms against their use and proliferation.

Pending their total elimination, States possessing nuclear weapons must commit to never use them.

We also need to step up preventive diplomacy at the global level in the face of growing fragmentation, and the potential emergence of geopolitical blocs with different trade rules, supply chains, currencies and internets.

The Policy Brief calls on all countries to prioritize diplomacy – particularly when states disagree; and to make full use of my good offices to bridge divides, so that humanity does not become collateral damage in an all-out geopolitical competition between major powers.

The United Nations, as the only truly universal platform, must be at the centre of these efforts.

The Policy Brief also calls for investment in regional security architectures that can rebuild trust between Member States and support diplomacy at the global level.

Excellencies,

Second, this Policy Brief sets out a vision for preventing conflict and violence, and sustaining peace, that applies to everyone, in all countries, at all times.

It calls for a paradigm for prevention that addresses all forms of violence; focuses on mediation; promotes social cohesion; prioritizes the links between sustainable development, climate action, and peace; and is anchored in full respect for all human rights – civil, political, economic, social and cultural.

That requires a comprehensive view of the peace continuum and a holistic approach that identifies root causes and prevents the seeds of war from sprouting.

The stagnation and reversal of progress on more than half the SDG targets has serious implications for global peace and security. It is no coincidence that countries affected by conflict are farthest behind on the SDGs.

We must accelerate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, recognizing that prevention and sustainable development are interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

Access to education and healthcare are proven development pathways that strengthen the social contract and human security.

The Policy Brief also calls for the transformation of gendered power dynamics across the board, including in peace and security.

Incrementalism has not delivered the Women, Peace and Security agenda.

Governments must take targeted steps, including the introduction of quotas, to ensure women’s meaningful participation and leadership in decision-making, eradicate all forms of violence against women, and uphold women’s rights.

The New Agenda for Peace also calls on Member States to reduce military spending and ban inhumane and indiscriminate weapons.

Excellencies,

The third priority area is to update our approach to peace operations, recognizing the realities of today’s conflicts.

United Nations peacekeeping represents multilateralism in action, giving all those who contribute a direct stake in our collective security.

It has contributed to saving millions of lives, by helping to preserve ceasefires, protect civilians from violence, and supporting parties to conflict to return to the peace table.

But longstanding unresolved conflicts, driven by complex domestic, geopolitical and transnational factors, and a persistent mismatch between mandates and resources, have exposed its limitations.

Peacekeeping operations cannot succeed where there is no peace to keep.

Nor can they achieve their goals without clear, prioritized and realistic mandates from the Security Council, centred on political solutions.

Missions must have adequate resources and the full political support of the Security Council, with active, continuous engagement with all parties.

The Policy Brief calls for a serious, broad-based reflection on the future of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations, with a view to moving towards nimble, adaptable models with appropriate exit strategies in place.

The fragmentation of conflicts, which often involve non-state armed groups, criminal gangs, terrorists and opportunists, has increased the need for multinational peace enforcement, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency operations.

The Policy Brief calls on Member States to recognize this need, and urges the Security Council to authorize peace enforcement action by regional and sub-regional organizations.

This action should be fully in line with the UN Charter and international humanitarian and human rights law, backed by inclusive political efforts to advance peace.

There is no continent in greater need of this new generation of peace enforcement missions than Africa.

The proliferation of non-state armed groups, including terrorist groups, operating across borders presents a major and growing threat in several parts of the continent.

The New Agenda for Peace therefore reiterates my call for peace enforcement missions and counter-terrorism operations, led by African partners with a UN Security Council mandate under Chapters VII and VIII of the UN Charter and with guaranteed funding including through assessed contributions.

Decisions on this are long overdue.

The New Agenda for Peace is a critical opportunity for Member States to begin the process of updating multilateral peace operations for today’s world.

Excellencies,

The fourth priority area is to prevent the weaponization of emerging domains and technologies, and promote responsible innovation.

From artificial intelligence to emerging biological risks, new technologies – and the complex interaction between them – present a host of new threats that go far beyond our current governing frameworks.

While there is broad agreement that international law applies in cyberspace, there is still a lack of clarity on how it applies – including in relation to the cyber dimensions of conflict.

The Policy Brief on a New Agenda for Peace puts forward detailed proposals for Member States to tackle the extension of hostilities to cyberspace and outer space.

Infrastructure essential for public services and to the functioning of society must be declared off-limits to malicious cyber activity.

It also calls on Member States to adopt, by 2026, a legally binding instrument to prohibit lethal autonomous weapons systems that function without human control.

It highlights the need for new national strategies to mitigate the peace and security implications of artificial intelligence. And it calls for a multilateral process to develop norms, rules and principles around military applications of AI, while ensuring engagement with stakeholders from industry, civil society and other sectors.

I welcome calls from some Member States, and from industry experts and the scientific community, to consider the creation of a new global body to mitigate the peace and security risks of AI while harnessing its benefits to accelerate sustainable development.

To inform discussions, I am convening a High Level Advisory Body to outline options on global AI governance, which will report back by the end of the year.

Excellencies,

The fifth priority area is updating our collective security machinery to restore its legitimacy and effectiveness.

The world needs collective security structures that represent the geopolitical realities of today, and the contributions made by different regions to global peace.

The New Agenda for Peace provides a generational opportunity to address this critical issue.

The Policy Brief recommends urgent reforms to the Security Council to make it more just and representative, and the democratization of its procedures.

It proposes revitalizing the work of the General Assembly and reforming the disarmament machinery.

It also proposes enhancing the role of the Peacebuilding Commission.

The Security Council in particular should more systematically seek the advice of the Commission on the peacebuilding dimensions of the mandates of peace operations.

Prevention at the global level also requires efforts to right the injustices and inequities built into our global financial architecture, which are addressed in our dedicated Policy Brief.

Excellencies,

Before I close, allow me to say a few words about the final two policy briefs expanding on the recommendations in Our Common Agenda.

The Policy Brief on Transforming Education will propose an overhaul of education systems to better equip individuals and societies with new skills, capacities and mindsets for our rapidly changing world.

At its core it will be a call for the creation of true learning societies in every country, built on comprehensive systems of lifelong learning; on a rethink of what and how we learn; and on scaled-up international cooperation to ensure access for all to education as a global public good.

The Policy Brief on UN 2.0 will set out my vision for a modernized United Nations that harnesses state-of-the-art skills and approaches to empower Member States in accelerating the 2030 Agenda.

We intend to shift expertise to areas that are vital in the 21st century: data, digital innovation, strategic foresight, and behavioural science.

We will also foster a more forward-thinking and inclusive culture across the UN, increasing support for creativity, agility, geographic diversity, gender equality, and youth empowerment.

The purpose of all the Policy Briefs in the series is to support your deliberations in preparation for the Summit of the Future next year.

The Summit will be an occasion to address the serious risks and significant opportunities we face;

To deliver on unmet commitments while rising to new challenges;

And to restore trust in each other and in multilateral action, through a Pact for the Future that updates global systems and frameworks to make them fit for the challenges of today and tomorrow.

I urge you to agree a scope for the Summit that is clear, streamlined and comprehensive, focused on new challenges and filling gaps in the multilateral system.

Excellencies,

Peace is the driving force behind the work of the United Nations.

Today’s new threats to peace create new demands on us. This Policy Brief on the new Agenda for Peace is our attempt to meet those demands.

I urge Member States to debate it and to engage with our proposals.

Time and again the United Nations has demonstrated its convening power as a platform for broad-based coalitions and effective diplomacy. Deep disagreements have been transcended to take collective action against critical threats.

Our Organization is, and must remain, central to multilateralism.

In our fractured, troubled world, it is incumbent upon States to preserve our universal institution, in which they all have a stake.

The time to act is not when the divisions and fractures have engulfed us.

The time to act is now.

Thank you.

***********************************************************************

[All-French]

Excellences,


Chers invités,


Mesdames et Messieurs,

J’ai le plaisir d’être ici aujourd’hui pour présenter notre note d’orientation sur le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix. Il s’agit-là de la dernière d’une série de notes d’orientation destinées à préciser les recommandations formulées dans Notre Programme commun.

Nous sommes à l’aube d’une ère nouvelle.

La période de l’après-guerre froide est terminée et nous nous dirigeons vers un nouvel ordre mondial et un monde multipolaire.

Cette note d’orientation consacrée au Nouvel Agenda pour la paix présente ma vision des efforts multilatéraux en faveur de la paix et de la sécurité, fondés sur le droit international, dans un monde en transition.

Cette nouvelle ère est déjà marquée par un niveau de tensions géopolitiques et de concurrence entre grandes puissances jamais atteint depuis des décennies.

De nombreux États Membres sont de plus en plus sceptiques quant à l’efficacité du système multilatéral.

Les violations du droit international sont de plus en plus fréquentes.

Des griefs profonds et, dans certains cas, justifiés, quant à la pratique de deux poids, deux mesures et aux engagements non respectés viennent nuire à la coopération.

Dans le même temps, le monde est confronté à des menaces nouvelles et émergentes qui exigent une action urgente et concertée.

Les conflits sont devenus plus complexes, plus meurtriers et plus difficiles à résoudre. L’année dernière, le nombre de décès liés aux conflits a atteint son plus haut niveau depuis près de trente ans.

Les inquiétudes quant à la possibilité d’une guerre nucléaire refont surface.

De nouveaux domaines potentiels de conflit en puissance et de nouvelles armes de guerre sont en train de donner à l’humanité de nouveaux moyens de s’anéantir elle-même.

Les inégalités qui existent entre les États et à l’intérieur de ceux-ci se creusent, exacerbées par la pandémie de COVID-19.

Les droits humains sont attaqués partout dans le monde, et un mouvement pernicieux fait reculer les droits des femmes.

La défiance à l’égard des institutions publiques s’accroît, alimentée par l’exclusion et la marginalisation.

Le terrorisme reste un fléau mondial.

L’urgence climatique intensifie la concurrence pour les ressources et exacerbe les tensions.

Et l’invasion de l’Ukraine par la Russie a fait qu’il est encore plus difficile de relever ces défis.

Si chaque pays remplissait ses obligations en vertu de la Charte, le droit à la paix serait garanti.

Lorsque les pays ne respectent pas ces engagements, ils créent un monde d’insécurité pour tous.

Les principes mêmes du multilatéralisme et du système de sécurité sont remis en question : la Charte des Nations Unies et le droit international ; les architectures de sécurité régionales ; le désarmement nucléaire et la désescalade.

Les cadres de coopération mondiale ne se sont pas adaptés à ce nouveau paysage mondial.

Il m’a été demandé dans la déclaration des 75 ans de l’ONU d’étudier les menaces mondiales et de formuler des recommandations concrètes sur la manière d’y répondre.

Ma note d’orientation sur le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix présente un ensemble complet et ambitieux de recommandations qui tiennent compte de la nature interdépendante de bon nombre de ces défis.

Elle s’articule autour des principes fondamentaux de confiance, de solidarité et d’universalité sur lesquels reposent la Charte et la stabilité du monde.

Cette note d’orientation s’inscrit également dans le cadre de mon engagement à mettre en rapport les actions en faveur de la paix et les objectifs de développement durable. Si nous concrétisons la vision exposée dans le Programme 2030, notre monde sera plus pacifique, plus sûr et plus durable.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix présente douze séries de propositions d’action concrètes, qui s’inscrivent dans cinq domaines prioritaires. Je vais passer brièvement en revue ces priorités.

Notre première priorité est de prendre des mesures énergiques pour renforcer la prévention au niveau mondial, en remédiant aux risques stratégiques et aux divisions géopolitiques.

Le régime de désarmement nucléaire et de maîtrise des armements est en voie d’érosion, la non-prolifération est remise en question et une course qualitative aux armements nucléaires est engagée.

Réduire la menace existentielle que représentent les armes nucléaires est une priorité urgente, mais cela ne suffit pas. Nous devons faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour faire taire cette menace, en éliminant les armes nucléaires.

Cette note d’orientation appelle donc les États Membres à s’engager à nouveau de toute urgence en faveur d’un monde exempt d’armes nucléaires et à renforcer les normes mondiales visant à prévenir l’utilisation et la prolifération de ces armes.

Tant que ces armes ne seront pas totalement éliminées, les États qui en sont dotés doivent s’engager à ne jamais les utiliser.

Nous devons également intensifier la diplomatie préventive au niveau mondial face à la fragmentation qui va en s’aggravant et à l’émergence potentielle de blocs géopolitiques qui auraient chacun leurs règles commerciales, leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement, leur monnaie et leur Internet.

Ma note d’orientation appelle tous les pays à donner la priorité à la diplomatie, en particulier lorsque les États sont en désaccord, et à tirer pleinement parti de mes bons offices pour surmonter les clivages, afin que l’humanité ne devienne pas un dommage collatéral d’une compétition géopolitique à outrance entre grandes puissances.

L’Organisation des Nations Unies, seule plateforme véritablement universelle, doit être au centre des efforts déployés.

La note d’orientation appelle également à investir dans des architectures de sécurité régionales qui peuvent rétablir la confiance entre les États Membres et promouvoir la diplomatie au niveau mondial.

Excellences,

Deuxièmement, cette note d’orientation propose une vision de la prévention des conflits et de la violence et du maintien de la paix qui s’applique à tous, dans chaque pays, à chaque instant.

Elle appelle à un nouveau paradigme de la prévention qui combatte la violence sous toutes ses formes, privilégie la médiation, promeut la cohésion sociale ;

Qui donne la priorité aux liens entre le développement durable, l’action climatique et la paix ;

Et qui est ancré dans le plein respect de tous les droits humains – civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux et culturels.


Pour cela, il faut envisager le continuum de la paix dans son ensemble et adopter une approche globale, qui identifie les causes profondes des conflits et empêche les graines de la guerre de germer.

La stagnation et l’inversion des progrès accomplis sur plus de la moitié des cibles associées aux Objectifs de développement durable ont de graves répercussions pour la paix et la sécurité internationales. Ce n’est pas une coïncidence si les pays touchés par un conflit sont aussi les plus en retard dans la réalisation des ODD.

Nous devons accélérer la mise en œuvre du Programme 2030, en ayant conscience que la prévention et le développement durable sont interdépendants et se renforcent mutuellement.

L’accès à l’éducation et aux soins de santé sont des moyens de développement dont on sait qu’ils permettent de renforcer le contrat social et la sécurité humaine.

La note d’orientation appelle également à une transformation des dynamiques de pouvoir genrées dans tous les domaines, notamment en matière de paix et de sécurité.

L’incrémentalisme – le changement à tout petit pas – n’a pas permis de réaliser le programme pour les femmes et la paix et la sécurité.

Les gouvernements doivent prendre des mesures ciblées, y compris l’introduction de quotas :

Pour garantir une participation significative et un leadership des femmes dans la prise de décision ;

Pour éliminer toutes les formes de violence à l’égard des femmes ;

Et faire pleinement respecter tous leurs droits.

Le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix appelle également les États Membres à réduire leurs dépenses militaires et à interdire les armes inhumaines et d’emploi aveugle.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

La troisième priorité est de revoir notre approche des opérations de paix, en tenant compte des réalités des conflits actuels.

Le maintien de la paix assuré par l’ONU représente le multilatéralisme en action, et tous ses acteurs participent directement à notre sécurité collective.

Il a contribué à sauver des millions de vies, en aidant à surveiller des cessez-le-feu, à protéger des civils de la violence et à faire en sorte que les parties à un conflit reviennent à la table des négociations.

Mais les conflits de longue date toujours non résolus, qu’alimentent des facteurs internes, géopolitiques et transnationaux complexes, ainsi que l’inadéquation persistante entre les mandats et les ressources, font clairement apparaître ses limites.

Les opérations de maintien de la paix ne peuvent pas réussir s’il n’y a pas de paix à maintenir.

Elles ne peuvent pas non plus atteindre leurs objectifs si le Conseil de sécurité ne leur confie pas des mandats clairs, assortis de priorités et réalisables, qui soient axés sur des solutions politiques.

Les missions doivent être dotées de ressources suffisantes et le Conseil de sécurité doit leur apporter son soutien politique total, en entretenant un dialogue actif et constant avec toutes les parties.

Ma note d’orientation invite à une réflexion approfondie et rigoureuse sur l’avenir des opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies, en vue d’élaborer des modèles de missions souples, modulables et dotées de stratégies de transition et de sortie appropriées.

En raison de la fragmentation des conflits, dans lesquels interviennent souvent des groupes armés non étatiques, des bandes criminelles, des terroristes et des opportunistes, il apparaît de plus en plus souvent nécessaire de recourir à des opérations multinationales d’imposition de la paix et de lutte antiterroriste et anti-insurrectionnelle.

Dans la note d’orientation, les États Membres sont priés de prendre acte de cette nécessité et le Conseil de sécurité est invité instamment à autoriser les organisations régionales et sous-régionales à mener des missions d’imposition de la paix.

Ces missions devraient être pleinement conformes à la Charte des Nations Unies, au droit international humanitaire et au droit international des droits de humains, et accompagnées d’initiatives politiques inclusives visant à promouvoir la paix.

Aucun continent n’a autant besoin de cette nouvelle génération de missions d’imposition de la paix que l’Afrique.

La prolifération des groupes armés non étatiques, y compris des groupes terroristes, qui opèrent de part et d’autre des frontières constitue une menace grave et croissante dans plusieurs régions du continent.

Ainsi, le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix réaffirme ma volonté de mettre en place des missions d’imposition de la paix et des opérations antiterroristes qui seraient dirigées par des pays africains, qui seraient dotées d’un mandat du Conseil de sécurité établi en vertu du Chapitre VII et du Chapitre VIII de la Charte des Nations Unies et dont le financement serait assuré par des contributions statutaires.

Il est grand temps de se prononcer sur cette question.

Le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix offre aux États Membres une occasion unique de commencer à adapter les opérations de paix multilatérales au monde d’aujourd’hui.

Excellences, Mesdames et Messieurs,

La quatrième priorité est d’empêcher la militarisation des nouveaux domaines et des nouvelles technologies et de promouvoir l’innovation responsable.

De l’intelligence artificielle aux nouveaux risques biologiques, les nouvelles technologies, et les interactions complexes qui existent entre elles, font apparaître une multitude de menaces nouvelles qui dépassent de loin nos cadres de gouvernance actuels.

S’il est largement admis que le droit international s’applique au cyberespace, les modalités de cette application demeurent en revanche peu claires, notamment pour ce qui est des aspects numériques des conflits.

Ma note d’orientation sur un Nouvel Agenda pour la paix présente des propositions détaillées à l’intention des États Membres visant à empêcher les affrontements de se propager dans l’espace et le cyberespace.

Les infrastructures indispensables à la fourniture des services publics et au fonctionnement de la société ne doivent pas être la cible d’activités numériques malveillantes.

Dans la note d’orientation, j’invite les États Membres à adopter, d’ici à 2026, un instrument juridiquement contraignant en vue d’interdire les systèmes d’armes létaux autonomes qui fonctionnent sans contrôle humain.

La nécessité d’élaborer de nouvelles stratégies nationales pour limiter les implications de l’intelligence artificielle sur la paix et la sécurité y est mise en lumière. Il s’agirait en outre d’élaborer, dans un cadre multilatéral, des normes, règles et principes venant encadrer les applications militaires de l’intelligence artificielle, tout en veillant à entretenir un dialogue avec les parties prenantes issues de l’entreprise, de l’université, de la société civile et d’autres secteurs.

Je me félicite que certains États Membres, ainsi que des experts issus du monde de l’entreprise et de la communauté scientifique, se mobilisent pour que soit envisagée la création d’un organe mondial chargé d’atténuer les risques que fait peser l’intelligence artificielle sur la paix et la sécurité tout en exploitant les avantages qu’elle procure pour accélérer le développement durable.

Pour éclairer les débats, je suis en train de mettre en place un organe consultatif de haut niveau chargé de présenter des options concernant la gouvernance mondiale de l’intelligence artificielle, lequel rendra son rapport d’ici à la fin de l’année.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

La cinquième priorité est de revoir notre mécanisme de sécurité collective afin d’en restaurer la légitimité et l’efficacité.

Le monde a besoin de structures de sécurité collective qui soient représentatives des réalités géopolitiques d’aujourd’hui et du concours que les différentes régions apportent à la paix mondiale.

Le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix offre une chance historique de s’atteler à cette tâche cruciale.

Dans la note d’orientation, je recommande de réformer de toute urgence le Conseil de sécurité pour le rendre plus juste et plus représentatif, et de démocratiser ses procédures.

J’y propose de revitaliser les travaux de l’Assemblée générale et de réformer les mécanismes de désarmement.

J’y propose également de renforcer le rôle de la Commission de consolidation de la paix.

Le Conseil de sécurité devrait solliciter plus systématiquement l’avis de la Commission, en particulier sur les aspects de consolidation de la paix des mandats des opérations de paix.

Il propose également de renforcer le rôle de la Commission de consolidation de la paix.

Le Conseil de sécurité, en particulier, devrait demander plus systématiquement l’avis de la Commission sur les dimensions de consolidation de la paix des mandats des opérations de paix.

La prévention à l’échelle mondiale nécessite également d’œuvrer à corriger les injustices et les inégalités de notre architecture financière mondiale, travail qui fait l’objet d’une note d’orientation distincte.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Avant de conclure, permettez-moi de dire quelques mots sur les deux dernières notes d’orientation dans lesquelles sont examinées de plus près les recommandations de Notre Programme commun.

Dans la note d’orientation sur la transformation de l’éducation, je propose une refonte des systèmes éducatifs de manière à mieux doter les personnes et les sociétés de nouvelles compétences, capacités et mentalités face à notre monde en mutation rapide.

Il s’agit essentiellement d’un appel en faveur de la création de véritables sociétés de l’apprentissage dans chaque pays, fondées sur des systèmes complets d’apprentissage tout au long de la vie, sur une réflexion en profondeur concernant nos objectifs et nos méthodes d’apprentissage, et sur le renforcement de la coopération internationale pour que toutes et tous aient accès à l’éducation en tant que bien public mondial.

Ma note d’orientation sur l’ONU 2.0 expose ma vision d’une ONU modernisée qui tire parti des meilleures compétences et solutions du moment pour donner aux États Membres les moyens d’accélérer la mise en œuvre du Programme 2030.

Nous entendons réorienter les compétences vers des domaines qui sont cruciaux au XXIe siècle : les données, le numérique, l’innovation, la prospective stratégique et les sciences comportementales.

Nous favoriserons également dans l’Organisation une culture davantage tournée vers l’avenir et plus inclusive, en soutenant davantage la créativité, l’agilité, la diversité géographique, l’égalité des genres et l’autonomisation des jeunes.

L’objectif de toutes les notes d’orientation de la série est d’accompagner vos débats en prévision du Sommet de l’avenir de l’année prochaine.

Le Sommet sera l’occasion d’examiner les risques graves auxquels nous faisons face et les principales perspectives qui s’ouvrent à nous,

d’honorer les engagements pris tout en relevant les nouveaux défis,

et de restaurer la confiance mutuelle et dans l’action multilatérale, grâce à un Pacte pour l’avenir visant à moderniser les systèmes et les structures à l’échelle mondiale pour qu’ils soient à la hauteur des défis d’aujourd’hui et de demain.

Je vous demande de définir un ensemble clair, structuré et complet d’ambitions pour le Sommet, l’accent devant être mis sur les nouveaux enjeux et les déficiences du système multilatéral.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

La paix est la force motrice de l’action de l’ONU.

Les nouvelles menaces qui pèsent aujourd’hui sur la paix nous imposent de nouvelles exigences. Cette note d’orientation traduit notre volonté de répondre à ces exigences.

J’invite instamment les États Membres à examiner ensemble le Nouvel Agenda pour la paix et à débattre de nos propositions.

À maintes reprises, l’ONU a fait la preuve son pouvoir fédérateur et de sa capacité de former de vastes coalitions et de faciliter les efforts diplomatiques. Des désaccords profonds ont été surmontés pour que des mesures collectives contre des menaces critiques puissent être prises.

Notre Organisation est et doit rester la colonne vertébrale du multilatéralisme.

Dans notre monde fracturé et troublé, il incombe aux États de préserver notre institution universelle ; il y va de leur intérêt à tous.

N’attendons pas d’être enlisés dans les dissensions et les fractures :

C’est maintenant qu’il nous faut agir.

Je vous remercie.


NEWSLETTER

Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


Read More

John Pike